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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 204 (some duplicates have been removed)
, the culture. they want education, they want a better transit system. they always have ideas to improve the municipal transit system. but when the talk about the bay area, including silicon valley, it is the same thing. transportation symptom -- systems, central subway, high- speed rail. clearly, bart to san jose has been incredibly important to everyone, so that people could travel. i think there is a lot more maturity. there are many successful company that have already turned a corner on making a profit. start-ups have long-term views. they are not looking for instant gratification, as i believe the attitude was in the late 1990's, 2000's. people are talking a lot about issues on stability and asking government, like ours, to be with them in the long term, and to create relationships. certainly, for capital investors, it really is that relationship building. they want that face-to-face time with investors around our city. so we are creating conditions for that to happen. they are not short-term leases, these are long-term leases. twitter signed in for a good 10 years. others have sig
and environment? >> it is critical. it is critical to have minds that have been educated, interdisciplinary people coming to the table, different perspectives, that energy and enthusiasm around thinking differently, and around paradigm shifts, around developing breakthrough technologies, and to be able to attract those people to this area is crucial. i think that that is something that has been a benefit of being here, that a lot of people are attracted to silicon valley. that is crucial to any company starting in taking their technology to the next level. >> can you talk about the incubator? >> yes. >> the qb3? >> yes, mission bay, everybody knows. uc san francisco has conduct encourage it with research. some of the larger companies that research labs in mission bay as well. bayer and others. they are even innovating about their laboratories, because it is so expensive to build your own laboratory. so they are trying to bring some of these pharmaceutical answers to the market faster. they have an incredible spirit of innovation in those laboratories. and they are inviting other companies, not jus
and department of education, so that we don't have any antitrust issues. that is an independent group. we at the american bar association are asking law schools to prepare for -- prepare 10 simple questions about what it costs to go to law school, how many of their students are employed upon graduation in real jobs, not artificial jobs, and we think it is going to be helpful. we also have a website that has a lot of information for anyone considering to go to law school, but probably the most important statistic that these potential students don't know is that the median income of lawyers in the united states is $62,000. they need to understand that before they incur $100,000 in debt. is there always room for another good lawyer? we need good lawyers. there always is. you have to ask yourself how much that you can afford -- how much debt you can afford. they have been watching too much "boston legal." you see $100,000 starting salaries. that may be for the top 10 students at the top 10 law schools. there were 30,000 graduates this year. what are the others going to do? there are jobs avai
educators. i was a little shocked when people started saying she's a lightning rod and a radical. because i thought what i was doing was just sort of bringing, you know, order and reason to the system. so, you know, at the end of the day i feel like it's bringing common sense to a dysfunctional system makes me a radical then i'm okay being a radical. i think everybody should be one. ( cheers and applause ) >> jon: sure. now, do you think... see, i am the son of a teacher. so i'm not... it's hard to be objective about it. do you think some of people's concern is what you might consider and obvious you say fired ineffective teachers, close some dysfunctional schools that they might be concerned that the metrics with which those are decided in their minds might be more arbitrary not to suggest that isn't a terrible bureaucracy in schools or there isn't any of those things but the reliance on the testing metric skewed some of the data for people and that they were concerned that those decisions were being based on arbitrary system they didn't necessarily agree with? >> i come from teachers too.
will discuss a national school choice week and the education options available to students across the country. first, we want about what's coming up on c-span2 and c- span3. 3's an2's booktv and c-span american history take -- american history tv ticket to santa fe, new mexico. that is coming up at noon -- a visit to local literary landmarks, interviews with authors from the area. here is a clip from santa fe writer james morris as he talks about joseph pulitzer and his book. >> i am james mcgrath morris. behind me stand some early printing presses. this seemed like a perfect place to talk about the man who revolutionized american newspapers. what i for started working on the book, people would react with recognition when i was writing about joseph pulitzer. it was clear from their expressions of anger about the name and not anything about his life. he shares his fate with alfred nobel, which is being well known for prize, but not well known for what he did in his life. alfred nobel was an explosive munitions maker. few people understand the significant role joseph pulitzer played in american
. there are places where we don't have market mechanisms. in health care and education, as we've gotten rich, those are bigger parts of the economy and our ability to use normal, private sector things to work in those areas is very, very weak. 95% of teachers are never given any feedback. never told, hey, you do this well, but you should work on this. go over and see how some other teacher calms the classroom down or makes a complex subject interesting. and i think if we bring feedback systems, which means measuring and telling people how they're doing, we bring that into areas like teaching, we can get more out of the education investments that we make. >> but you think that because of technology and that kind of thing, americans today have many more opportunities in some sense than they had before? >> that's right. if you take median income and that means we haven't had this big improvement. >> which hasn't changed in the last 25 years. >> that really understates what's happened. i mean, would you rather be a gay man 20 years ago, 50 years ago? in africa and gdp didn't go up, but life spans almos
is assassinated in front of his home. >> the german education minister is stripped of her document for playing it -- her doctorate for plagiarism, and the opposition calls for her resignation. >> the political crisis in tunisian deepened dramatically tonight following the assassination of a top opposition leader and the violent unrest that has followed in the wake of his killing. troops have been deployed in a number of locations to restore order. >> the killing of the prominent secular politician has sparked protests across the country. supporters flooded the streets of tunis and other cities. there are reports of barricades being erected in clashes with police. >> news of the assassination sparked protests in several tunisian cities. in the capital, thousands of angry protesters followed the ambulance carrying belaid's body. many blame the islamists, an accusation the party denies. >> people know that the criminals are directly linked to the head of the party. >> all these islamist organizations have a reputation of terrorist groups. history is a witness. it is not possible to discuss, negot
for failed education systems, failed school systems to get their acts together. throughout the country there are some promising signs that we can bring schools and parents together to improve our educational system. san francisco public schools adopted a funding mechanism according to what's termed a weighted student formula. under this policy the more students a school attracts, the more money that school, its administrators and teachers receive. low-income students are weighted heavier and the funding forum as our children with disabilities, and those learning english as a second language. so there's incentives are schools to seek the more vulnerable population, and reasons for schools to differentiate themselves and to excel. imagine if we were to try and move in this direction with federal funding. allow the money we truly spend to actually follow individual children. students, including those without a lot of money for those with special needs, we be able to access a school which would give them a shot at having a successful life, a shot at earning their success and achieving thei
three, and critically important as education and guidance. more than ever workers are responsible for saving and planning for their retirement. they need help understanding a range of financial topics from the most basic information about how to enroll and how much they should save to the more complex topics such as proper asset allocation and in come planning. workers had received guidance take action and have better outcomes. our data shows that workers who engage in a retirement planning session as and nexium pulled either online or on the phone increase their deferral rates on average by five to six percentage points. one thing that is constant in all of our research is that a majority of workers want and need help. workers also need a simple way to gauge their savings process. last fall fidelity released new research on age based savings guidelines. these guidelines serve as a framework for establishing the retirement savings goals as workers progress through their careers, their salary, time a factor of x can be one of the measures used to assess the retirement savings progr
budget is up to 20% and the next decade is 30% of our budget. it takes away from education, infrastructure, other health and human service needs. so medicaid and the need to have flexibility is something we are go to go watch as we go forward. let me finish where i started. we need to address the rising costs of health care. i don't think the affordable care act does that. we have provided an opportunity with our health care exchange in utah is a model based on good principles that allows businesses to provide as a benefit and health with competitive forces and consumer control to, in fact, have an impact on the rising costs of health care. it may be imperfect, but it's a step in the right direction. again, the fundamental position i'm taking and we're taking in utah is that the free market works if you allow it. and takes politicians like myself and others to be disciplined and to give time for the marketplace to work. we sometimes are so anxious to fix the problem, that we don't let the marketplace make the adjustments necessary to get the right outcome. and again as i sa
, and he turned the country upside down and told us that we did not need to go through formal education. we all needed to learn from farmers and workers, and that was how we would get reeducated. it was the biggest persecution of educated families. tavis: so at eight years old, you ended up in a dormitory, and you are looking out for your little sister, at the age of age. take me back to the dormitory and tell us how like sort of begins anew for you in this camp, as it were. >> yes. in the beginning, it was really confusing and scary, because we did not have food. the room had no wash basin, no kitchen facility, and we were taken to the soccer field to witnessed the killing of teachers, and we were brainwashed that we were nobody, and we were born with black blood, as part parents were called that. >> what becomes your daily routine when you are 8 years old? 8, 9, 10? >> the first few months was chaos. we were nobody. then i think about one year later, i was assigned to work in the factory. some of the older kids got sent, but i was too young. i went to a factory, and then later i learned h
budget which means it takes money away from other areas like education infrastructure and other health service needs. medicaid and the need to have flexibility is going to be certainly something we will watch as we go forward. let me finish by ending where i started. we need to address the rising cost of health health health ca. i don't think the affordable care act does that. i think we have provided an opportunity with their health care exchange and utah that allows businesses to contain to provide benefits and help with competitive forces and consumer control to in fact have an impact on the rising cost of health care. it may be imperfect but it's a step i think in the right direction. again the fundamental position that i'm taking and we are taking in utah is the free market works if we will allow it. it takes politicians like himself and others out there to be disciplined and to give time for the marketplace to work. we sometimes are so i just a problem that we don't look at making adjustments that are necessary to get the right outcome. and as i said, if we want the best quality
. without too many houses, houses never face. we should've invested in technology, manufacturing, education. we should've spent less and save more. we should've borrowed this from foreigners. the important thing people don't get, housing this consumption because people individually think they invested in the house. we can assume a house like another mobile. what they're really doing is over consuming. we had a massive overconsumption. it's analogous to eating the seed corn as analogous. protect millions of people headed to the the wrong thing. we talked and honda both houses to the mortgage bankers, presidential legal attorney. those millions of people try to learn how to do something it's productive in a global economy. in addition, construction which is their competitive. you try that manufacturing wages, which we did with this artificial construction boom in miniature of millions of manufacturing jobs overseas to places they can have china and initially people in india and china didn't know how to do the work while. for having a really difficult time getting those jobs back. they make a
that deny economic opportunities to women and girls, rooted in education and business and investment are not going to be as prosperous as they might otherwise be. so it became clear that if i was going to be traveling around talking about diplomacy and development, urging changes in economic structures, introducing what we call economic statecraft to be a central pillar of our foreign policy you had to talk outomen and girls and so i've tried to do that. >> restrictions on women's economic participation are costing us massive amounts of economic growth and income in every region of the world. >> this work, ensuring that women are equal partners, as they should be, and are free to realize their own god-given potential, was one of the great pieces of unfinished business of the 21st century. with this equal futures partnership, we are taking an important step toward trying to finish that business. through this initiative, governments from around the world are making concrete commitments to support women in two key areas -- political participation and economic opportunity. >> have you go
to come to the city and council to defray the costs and acts of service and to educate small businesses on action steps to achieve accessibility compliance. dbi is meeting with the office of small business to determine the most appropriate use of these very limited funds. and which are the result of passage of senate bill, 1186 by the state legislature last september so that is something that is important to us based on the conversations in the past. >> acting director, director and i have recently met with the office of small business to executive director to discuss ongoing compliance issues around the number of vacant commercial storefronts. >> it does not appear that it could effectively address, vacant storefronts especially in buildings otherwise occupied. we remain available for follow up discussions on these issues. these conversations are helpful and we obviously can't accomplish the goals all of the time. but at least the communication we can come up with creative ways of assisting these issues to the department. >> dbi along with other departments is participating in the data
are politically motivated. >>> a pakistani girl shot for advocating women's rights and education has released a video thanking people for their support. she recorded the message before undergoing another operation at a hospital in the united kingdom. >> i'm getting better day by day. it's because of the prayers of people, and because of these prayers, and because of these prayers, god has given me this new life. >> malala shot in the head by the pakistani taliban as she left school last october. the 15-year-old was critically wounded and flown to britain for treatment. malala discharged last month, but on saturday, back in the hospital for another five-hour operation. doctors reconstructed the left side of her skull, with a metal plate. they also inserted a small electronic device to restore her hearing. the message released was the first since the attack. she expressed determination to continue the fight for the education of women and girls. >> i want to serve. i want to serve the people, and i want every girl, every child to be educated. >> reporter: the hospital says malala's most recent s
from the ceo of deloitte on the meeting. take a listen. >> it was more an education, a discussion and i was actually pretty happy to see business at the table being able to engage in important policy issues. there was no pressure or direction in terms of what positions to take or not take. >> and that's important because there are some competing visions out here. you have the president pushing for his plan but republicans up on capitol hill and some democrats want to make sure that before there's any kind of major amnesty program or registration with some probation period on the pathway to citizenship, there's a lot more border security and enforcement of existing immigration laws. melissa? back to you. melissa: peter barnes, thanks so much for that report. now turning to our "money" power panel to weighn on how the president's economic agenda would be affected by immigration reform, with me is christian dorsey, economic policy institute and mercedes slap for former spokesperson for president george w. bush and steve camerota, center for immigration studies. what do you think about this
't understand on the education we provide for all our children. it's with great pleurisy introduce the mayor of the city of san francisco. good morning thank you laura republican for that kind introduction and thank you for opening your divorces to me this morning. i want to honor david and all your supervisors and to our two newest supervisors. mayor brown thank you for being here and taking the time to join us this morning. you have done so much in this county >> and since this is my first city address i'm hoping you'll cut me some slack if you chose to write about it in the newspapers. to the department heads and consistent leaders and education leaders to all of you who are online and thank you all of you for joining us this morning. and, of course, to my wonderful wife, mother and friend thank you for being here and pitting up with me for all these years >> a year ago i stood before i and score my term of office pledging to seize the year of the dragon to focus on jobs and to make bold decisions for your future. and to work together with all our stoifrz to put it lanely to get things
there needs to be a move to put a mark based process in education . if schools are underperforming hit the breakings. >> what do you say monica. >> they are adult mersion of time out for kid. this would never happen in the private sector. cost is so outrageous. new york city alone 2012 cost taxpayers 20 million to keep the rubber rooms going . another million for substitute teacher and doesn't include the cost for taxpayerings. >> while we wait to find out if the kids were harassing the kids they're being paid. >> the system is laughable. there are amazing teachers out there and that's not what we talk about. we talk about the cracks in rubber rooms. stop paying the people. who cares about the loop holes. >> this is outrageous . what we have to do is step back and look at it. five percent and tracey is spot on. think about this. the best nations in the world that has the highest in education have are you percent of the teachers come from the one-third of college graupts . finland has it is teachers in the top 10 percent . we only get one-fourths. >> what are suggesting. we increase wag
research and education. cuts to military personnel and law enforcement. cuts that will cause jobs and do real harm to the american economy as it struggles to recover. and the reality is that we don't even have that much time. we only have nine legislative days left in february to address the issue. nine days to negotiate a trillion-dollar deal with the senate and the president. and instead of a meaningful plan to address the crisis that we need to avert, we have this nonsense before us today. this is no way to govern. the disturbing truth is that many republicans seem downright giddy when it comes to the sequester cuts. there is new story after new story of how we'll let the sequester take effect. the gentleman from georgia, dr. price, couldn't support these cuts fast enough. i was shocked. mr. speaker, it was only last week that the economic numbers for the fourth quarter of 2012 were released. unexpectedly we saw a contraction in those numbers, a contraction fueled by a massive reduction in defense spending. what do you know, huge cuts in government spending during a fragile economic r
encourage people who get educated in the united states, in colleges or working with universities, key people in the united states, not encourage companies and people to go back to the home countries. so this issue has recently become an issue fo for deloitte. you know, we've looked at this from a broad prison for a while, but like other companies, microsoft, oracle, the high-tech compass, into, a lot of companies and services companies, you know, this is a recent thing given some of the challenge we've had to actually hire and maintain and fill needs. so as an intro statistic, we hire every year about 7000 employees, 7000 people out of colleges and universities. and that's still not enough to be able to fill the needs of our clients, given a tradition and turnover and things of that nature. sort of streamlined the process. we all know about the backlogs that exist right now and how long it actually takes from beginning to end, and the timing of that and how quickly we can get people deploy to our clients to help them come again like i said before, solve that problem and innovate, which also
mailers in march, next month, and will be conducting a number of educational efforts to make sure we reach all business customers. as we get closer to the delivery scheduled change in in august, we will be publishing information in post offices, putting it online and other customer contact to make sure our residential customers know. let me conclude with a couple of thoughts. this announcement today is just one part of a much larger strategy to return the postal service to long-term financial stability. the plans saves $2 billion annually, that we have a $20 billion gap to close. we are striving to raise revenues, reduce costs and gain efficiencies throughout the entire organization and making this change to our delivery schedule is a big-ticket item and simply too big of a cost savings to ignore. in fact, i would strongly argue it would be irresponsible for the postal service not to pursue this course. second, we are implementing this approach to improve our overall business performance. there is a strong and growing demand for our package service and we need to meet that over the coming
of state boards of accountancy to provide continuing professional education, credits for accounting professional. so we are quite excited of that and hopefully you will as well. this accreditation highlights the value of this and other programs that would hold her at the chamber. for more information on that please visit our website, or speak to some of folks outside in the registration desk. after the video i'm going to ask marty to come up directly and begin the program the first award from our sponsor, the gfi group. >> good morning. gfi group is delighted to continue its support of the national chamber foundation's quarterly economic briefing. the goal is to affect the impact of public policy on u.s. bases and the global economy. gfi group is an american company headquartered in new york city with shares trade on the new stock exchange. gfi employs close to 2000 people and over a dozen offices and most of the world's major financial centers. as you meet us when gfi employs are hard at work around the globe and here in new york and executing billions of dollars in transactions ac
you live could determine your education, right? but there is a campaign to try to change that. former wnba star lisa leslie is leading the way. why she's shifting her way from basketball, her focus here on to education. [ female announcer ] today, jason is here to volunteer to help those in need. when a twinge of back pain surprises him. morning starts in high spirits, but there's a growing pain in his lower back. as lines grow longer, his pain continues to linger. but after a long day of helping others, he gets some helpful advice. just two aleve have the strength to keep back pain away all day. today, jason chose aleve. just two pills for all day pain relief. try aleve d for strong, all day long sinus and headache relief. stop! stop! stop! come back here! humans -- we are beautifully imperfect creatures living in an imperfect world. that's why liberty mutual insurance has your back with great ideas like our optional better car replacement. if your car is totaled, we give you the money to buy one a model year newer. call... and ask one of our insurance experts about it today. hello?!
for public education as to how you should be doing these things. if you join the nra and go to one of the 80,000 trainers you get that. there are a lot of people that aren't nra members. the public education campaign on the safety of firearms would be great. we would love to support it. >> first of all, i would like to get the signup sheet for the field trip for the gun show. [laughter] >> i'll tell you what, the next time they have the gun show, i'll have a signup sheet. if anybody wants to go i'll take them. i can't get you in for free. >> sometimes so you a little bit of an expense. [laughter] >> there's been a lot of talk about whether this is different. and it's a political question not an ideological question. do you think this time is different? and if it is, it doesn't seem that the nra has changed in any way the positions on what is acceptable or not acceptable to reflect that. i have another question. i'll let you answer that one. >> sure. i think that our opponents hope this is different in the sense they hope they can use a motion to achieve an antifirearm agenda they haven't bee
to me. she was great. she is articulate, very well educated, did some wonderful things, knew how to handle the power of male egos. but the press would not give her the same accolades, the general media would not give for this and accolades, not because she was competent, but because of her political ideology. there is some dispute bi -- skewed bias rating hillary clinton for some of the wrong things. host: on twitter -- "the washington post" adds this as far as analysis of her time in office -- "many of clinton's successes appeared to be due largely to her personal popularity and famous work ethics, attributes that were on display in her final days in office." nevada. caller: i would like to make a few comments about hillary clinton. i think the only reason she ever had her job was because of her husband, bill. she did exactly what she has been told to do by the president's, and a lot of us are not on tune with president obama's schedule, especially this benghazi deal. whenever a person throws her hands up in the air and is not want to admit to any responsibility of a job done po
campaign for girl'' education in pakistan despite the attack. you are watching "bbc world news america." still to come -- backstage drama at russia's famous bolshoi ballet after an attack on its artistic director. now one of its biggest stars claims there is a conspiracy against him. we may finally have an answer to one of the most hotly contested questions in science -- where did we all evolves from -- evolve from? an international effort has been mapping out thousands of trades to tradestrait -- traits to unlock the clues. >> it is interesting to see that this hypothetical central ancestors had a number of features very different from ours. very -- for example, for all over its body. a white, for a belly, long, furry tail -- white, furry belly and long, furry tail. fleshy nose not unlike ours. it had year bonds to help it here and translate sounds from noise into neurological impulses -- it had ear bones. it had some features that were like us and some that were different. we might be able to pick this up in both of our hands, but it is different in that it is much less specialized.
be the key to higher education and perhaps even brilliance for a lot of folks who don't necessarily have the time or money for college. say nothing of an ivy league school. online learning is hardly new. it's been around for a long time. but open access to classes at some of this nation's most prestigious institutions is new. and people of all kinds and all ages are signing on. our report from our chief education correspondent, rehema ellis. >> reporter: the college classroom is changing. courses from some of the world's most elite universities are now available to anyone for free. at a furious pace, schools are participating with start-up companies like coursera to deliver online courses. or m.o.o.k.s. >> much faster than any of us were expecting. we reached our first 1 million users faster than facebook. >> reporter: physics, poetry, astronomy, even guitar, all just a click away. university of virginia retooled his modern history course for this semester's online debut. the class usually open to 120 students saw enrollment soar. >> 42,000 students around the world. >> reporter: to put
's behavior by members of the military and a savings plan and he finds financial education program substantially increased savings in the tsp have had no or sunpak, for example, on the amount of credit for military members have outstanding. so re-signing of crowd out there. the society by my colleague at harvard looking at denmark are much better data and they are so concerned about privacy. when they look at automatic savings programs, they found little cutout and other parts of the balance sheet either. so i think it's a legitimate concern, though most of the evidence suggests certainly it's not one-for-one offset. >> any other thoughts on the crowd out at all ms. mccarthy? >> i would offer we don't have it. the complexity it would affect the asset the pain is difficult. it's important on the automatic enrollment is a significant impact in getting participants into the plan. our enrollment rate, participation rate is 67% previous automatic enrollment 80%. it's a very powerful distinction in and of itself is so dramatic that it's hard for me to think is creating a big distraction
the fact that for example education wasn't a primary issue in the presidential debate i think is extraordinarily problematic. because i realize the focus is on the economy and jobs, but we're not going to regain our position in the global marketplace till we fix our public education. >> i hear the president talking about it as being a priority but i don't see a lot of evidence of it being a priority. >> well, it certainly wasn't in the presidential campaign. you did not hear the candidates really talking about the education policy issues. and i think that was problematic. >> what do you want to see done? putting students first sounds a great idea till you have to somehow -- you've got 120,000 schools in america. >> right. >> what are the overview bullet points you would like to see happen which could radically change america's education system to start making it more competitive? >> so there are three primary things we focus on at students first. the first is making sure there's a highly effective teacher in front of every child every single day. the second area is -- >> you g
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 204 (some duplicates have been removed)